Software Updates Available For iPhone, iPod Touch, And iPad (3/10/14)

On Monday, March 10th, Apple released a software update for iPhones, iPod Touches, and iPads. The software update contains numerous improvements and bug fixes. You can install the software update by following the instruction found below.

HOW TO UPDATE IPHONE OR IPAD TO 7.1

Tap on Settings

Tap on General

Tap on Software Update

Tap on Download and Install or Install Now. Note: You must have more than 50% battery or be plugged into power to install the update.

Tap on Agree

Your device will automatically restart itself when the update is ready to install.

Biggest Change To iOS 7.1

The thing that most people will notice right away is that the shift key looks different

If the background is white and the arrow is dark, and there's a horizontal line beneath the arrow, you're in ALL CAPS mode.

If the background is white and the arrow is dark, and there's a horizontal line beneath the arrow, you're in ALL CAPS mode.

If the background is white and the arrow is black, you're in Upper case mode.

If the background is white and the arrow is black, you're in Upper case mode.

If the background is dark gray and the arrow is white, you're in lower case mode.

If the background is dark gray and the arrow is white, you're in lower case mode.


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Ask The Nice Guy - Portable Battery Packs, iPad Messaging, Selling Old Smartphones

This is the 16th post in a series called Ask The Nice Guy. In this series I will attempt to provide answers to the various questions I get asked throughout the week.

What’s inside? Here are the questions answered in this blog post, boiled down to five word (or less) summaries.

  1. Portable Battery Pack
  2. Texting From iPad
  3. Sell Old Smartphone

QUESTION 1: Which Portable Battery Pack Would You Recommend?

The kids gave us a smart phone for Christmas, and I would like to buy a battery pack charger. Hopefully, one that I could use to charge all of my devices (Kindle, iPod, iPhone, and iPad). What do you recommend?

A portable battery pack can be a great buy for people who travel and want to make sure that they don't find themselves in a position where they can't use their device because they forgot to charge it the night before and now you have a four hour wait at the airport (outlets at airports are always at a premium).

Based on my research I would recommend the Satechi 10000 MaH Portable Energy Station Extended Battery Charger Pack.

It costs around $60 and should work with most gadgets out there (not laptops). It has two USB ports on it so you can charge your smart phone and another device at the same time. At a full charge the Satechi should be able to fully charge an iPhone 5 six times and have a little juice leftover.


QUESTION 2: How Does Texting Work From The iPad?

Why can I text some people from my iPad and not others (yet I can do those from my iPhone)?

The iPhone & iPad both have an app called Messages. The Messages app on the iPhone is capable of sending traditional text messages (SMS/MMS) while the Messages app on the iPad is not capable of sending traditional text messages (SMS/MMS).

The Messages app on the iPhone & iPad can send iMessages. iMessages can only be sent to other Apple devices (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, Macs).

The reason you are able to "text" some people from your iPad is due to the fact that the iPad can send an iMessage to people you know that have an iPhone and/or iPad and have also registered their phone number or email address with iMessage.

To learn more about iMessage visit Apple's website


QUESTION 3: SELLING OLD SMARTPHONE?

I recently upgraded to a new iPhone and want to try and get some money for my previous phone (HTC Incredible 2). What are some of my best options for selling an used smartphone?

You can always sell used items on Craiglist and eBay. I am going to recommend a couple websites that are dedicated to either purchasing your used smartphone (Gazelle) or helping you sell your used smartphone to another buyer (Swappa).

Gazelle makes it really easy to sell your used smartphone. If you aren't selling one of the more popular phones (iPhone, Galaxy S3, Galaxy S4) you may not be offered a very good price though.

  • Find your item on www.gazelle.com. If the item is not on our website, unfortunately we do not accept it. Please do NOT select an item if it does not exactly match your item exactly, we will not be able to offer you anything for it.
  • Once you've found your item, let us know what condition its in by answering a few questions. Please remember the rating of "Flawless" would be for an item which appears and functions as if it has never been used.
  • If you like our offer just complete the checkout process and tell us how you'd like to get paid: Check, PayPal or Amazon.com gift card.
  • Shipping is FREE! We'll even send you a box for qualified orders (small electronics over $30.00).
  • Our offer is good for 30 days but the faster you send it in, the quicker you'll get paid.
  • Once we receive your box, the Gazelle team will check out the contents and pay you quickly.

Swappa allows you to list and sell your smartphone on a site dedicated for buyers and sellers of smartphones.

  • No seller fees! Swappa does not charge listing or insertion fees. Buyer pays a flat "sale fee" only when listing sells.
  • Get paid faster. A listing is not considered sold until the buyer pays.
  • Our support staff are experienced mobile users. We are actually helpful and appreciate your business.
  • Just mobile devices... Swappa is easy to use because it's just for buying and selling mobile devices.
  • We use PayPal too, so you are protected.

If you appreciate the free content on NiceGuyTechnology.com please support Mike by shopping on Amazon. If you click on the link and buy something, Mike will receive a small percentage of your purchase and it won't cost you any extra! Thanks for your consideration!

5 Things - Week Ending 01/24/14

This is the 56th post in a series called 5 Things. Each week I will share a combination of technology articles and apps that I have discovered and liked in the past week. Anything highlighted in blue is a link to an article, an app, or another section of my website.

But Target’s latest misfortune should surprise to no one — least of all Target. The security measures that Target and other companies implement to protect consumer data have long been known to be inadequate. Instead of overhauling a poor system that never worked, however, the card industry and retailers have colluded in perpetuating a myth that they’re doing something to protect customer data — all to stave off regulation and expensive fixes.

The whole Target situation is a mess. It doesn't surprise me that this happened though. It is very lucrative for hackers to try and get credit card and debit card information and then either use it or sell it on the black market.

When I teach my community ed class titled "Staying Safe In A Digital World", I recommend that you never use your debit card online. I think I am going to add that you should never use your debit card in the real world. The fact that your debit card is linked directly to your checking accoutn where your money is sitting doesn't feel very safe with people hacking away at websites and physical retail stores.

I would just assume that American Express takes all the risk if my card number gets stolen.


After hack, Target offers year of free credit monitoring

Dara Kerr:

Tens of thousands of people likely received a conciliatory e-mail from Target on Wednesday (1/15/14). In an effort to temper the repercussions of its massive data breach, the big-box retailer offered to give affected customers one year of free credit monitoring from Experian — valued at $191.

To sign up for the free year of credit monitoring you will need to visit https://creditmonitoring.target.com and sign up before April 23rd.


When ATMs were introduced more than 40 years ago, they were considered advanced technology. Today, not so much. There are 420,000 ATMs in the U.S., and on April 8, a deadline looms for nearly all of them that underscores how sluggishly the nation’s cash delivery system moves forward. That’s the day Microsoft (MSFT) cuts off tech support for Windows XP, meaning that ATMs running the software will no longer receive regular security patches and won’t be in compliance with industry standards.

Sounds like the ATM industry better get to work or they may find themselves the next target of the hacker community...


T-Mobile wireless price war feared

Brad Reed:

Here’s how you know that T-Mobile is onto something: It’s making Wall Street very nervous for all the right reasons. Reuters recently talked with several financial analysts who all expressed fear that T-Mobile was sparking a pricing war in the wireless industry and that carriers were starting to actually compete with one another for our business.

I switched to T-Mobile this fall when I bought my iPhone 5S and I couldn't be happier with them. I had a good experience at the T-Mobile store in Apple Valley. I like the fact that they don't have two year contracts. They offer interest free financing if you don't want to shell out big bucks upfront for the iPhone or other smarthphones. Unlimited minutes, text, and data is also a big plus and the LTE network is extremely fast in the Twin Cities. I am also able to use my iPhone in over 100 countries without having to pay crazy international roaming fees!

I plan on sticking with T-Mobile for the forseeable future and would definitely recommend it to a friend!


How Phishing and Email Scams Work - and How You Can Avoid Them

Trent Hamm:

First of all, you should never fully trust that an email is actually from whoever it says in the From: field. It is rather easy to fake such information and it’s because of the implicit trust that people have of the email recipient that many scammers are able to get away with it.

Trent runs one of my favorite websites, The Simple Dollar. He mostly writes about personal finance but also answers questions that his readers send him. The question about how to avoid identity theft online was asked and his simple answer was to not click on links in emails. In this article he elaborates further since people had more questions. I would encourage everyone to click the link titled How Phishing and Email Scams Work - and How You Can Avoid Them because I want everyone to understand how these scams work and I don't want any of my clients or community ed students to call me because they got bamboozled.


If you appreciate the free content on NiceGuyTechnology.com please support Mike by shopping on Amazon. If you click on the link and buy something, Mike will receive a small percentage of your purchase and it won't cost you any extra! Thanks for your consideration!