Tech Terms Explained - HDMI

This is the 2nd post in a series called Tech Terms Explained. It is my goal to help you gain a better understanding of the various tech terms that you may come across.

High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) is a digital interface for transmitting audio and video in a single cable.

Most high-definition televisions support HDMI. Numerous devices that plug in to your high-definition television also support HDMI.

Devices that have HDMI include:

  • Some DVD players
  • Some Cable/Satellite boxes
  • Some computers
  • Blu-Ray players
  • Apple TV
  • Roku
  • Xbox 360
  • Playstation 3

Below you see a picture of a HDMI cable. Both ends of the cable are identical so it does not matter which end you plug into your high-definition television and which end you plug into your device.

canstockphoto10646922.jpg

My hope is that the following advice saves you money in the future!

No matter what, though, there is absolutely no picture or sound quality difference between a $3.50 cable and a $1,000 cable.
— Geoffrey Morrison from CNET

Don't allow a salesperson to talk you into purchasing an expensive "premium" HDMI cable. This is where places like Best Buy make a ton of their profit. I would recommend the AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable that cost a little less that $6. I have purchased numerous of these for myself and others and have never had a problem.


If you appreciate the free content on NiceGuyTechnology.com please support Mike by shopping on Amazon. If you click on the link and buy something, Mike will receive a small percentage of your purchase and it won't cost you any extra! Thanks for your consideration!

Tech Terms Explained - RAM

This is the 1st post in a series called Tech Terms Explained. It is my goal to help you gain a better understanding of the various tech terms that you may come across.

Random Access Memory (RAM) is the short term memory of a computer. The RAM temporarily stores all the data required for the operating system and software to function.

 Pictured above are RAM modules.  The top one is typically found in laptops and the bottom one is typically found in desktops.

Pictured above are RAM modules.  The top one is typically found in laptops and the bottom one is typically found in desktops.

When a computer is powered off, all the data stored in RAM is lost. This is in contrast to a hard drive which will store files long term even when the computer is powered off.

I like to share the following analogy with people when I try to explain what RAM is and what it does.

RAM is like a freeway. Everything that is running in your computer goes on the RAM freeway. Sometimes too much stuff is running at the same time, and there is a traffic jam in the RAM and your computer slows way down. Adding more RAM is like adding more lanes to your freeway. A nice wide freeway with lots of RAM will help everything run as fast as possible.
Traffic.png

You will experience less "traffic jams" on your computer when the amount of RAM is higher.

Since starting my business in 2011, I have seen clients with computers ranging from 256 megabytes (MB) of RAM all the way up to clients with 16 gigabytes (GB) of RAM. I personally have 4 gigabytes (GB) of RAM in my MacBook Air.

If you were purchasing a new computer in 2013, I wouldn't recommend any less than 4 gigabytes (GB). The majority of people reading this blog post probably wouldn't benefit from any more than 8 gigabytes (GB).

If you feel that your current Mac or PC is slower than you would like, perhaps you could benefit from adding more RAM to your machine. This is one of the least expensive ways to make your computer faster and can often extend the useful lifespan of the computer. It typically cost between $20-$80 to purchase additional RAM for most computers.

I have helped numerous clients increase the RAM in their computers. Here is what one person had to say after I helped him increase his RAM.

“Mike helped upgrade our Mac with new ram and a new operating system this past month. It’s like having a new computer.
— Ray N. from Farmington, MN

To find out how much RAM you have on your computer you can follow the instructions for Windows and Macs.